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Failure of Clyde To Pay for Guns
Delivery Is Fatal

Henchman, Caught by Officers, Gives Val-
uable Information


LONGVIEW, Texas, May 23—Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker, will-o'-the-wisp killers, whose sanguine trail was terminated in a blast of gunfire and death in a small and rural Louisiana town Wednesday, frequently moved in and out of Gregg County but so far as is known their sorties into this sector were made as sociable calls on relatives and were bloodless.

In recent weeks there have been a number of developments along a far flung East Texas and Louisiana fron to indicate the capture or death of the elusive Barrow and Bonnie Parker was imminent. Officers, grim-faced and heavily armed, have moved out of Longview on several occasions durinig recent weeks, following tips on the desperate pair. hose enforcers of the law were serious. They went to kill, capture or face the hazards of battles with Barrow and his woman.

A posse of officers, among them Charles Gant and Marvin Utzman, slipped quietly out of Longview Tuesday night, turning their automobilestoward Winnsboro where the Barrows had arranged for a clandestine meeting with a henchman, a man who had delivered guns and ammunition to them in a stolen automobile. That trip to a Barrow rendezvous, in a stolen Dallas machine, proved to be the man's undoing, and hardened his heart toward the outlaw' pair which he previously had served as contact man and aid.

Gun Runner in Jail

The man is in jail here now. He gave his name as J. A. Nichols, Dallas, and officers say he is facing eleven charges in Dallas. The trend of his conversation indicates he had connection with one of the greatest rings in Dallas' history. He was taken in custody earlier in the week by Deputies Marvin Utzman and Charles Gant a1 a Gladewater road cottage.

When officers told him Wednesday that Barrow and Bonnie had failed in their efforts to rea<;h their guns met the fate which they have so unrelentlessly meted out to others—his head dropped to his chest. He said nothing. Apparently gone, momentarily at least, was his desire to have the law deal with those whom he charged caused his arrest.

Nichols' story was a long one. Officers weighed it thoroughly and were inclined to believe him. He appeared to be too much "in the know" to be leading officers astray. He told of taking an automobile in Dallas, loading guns and ammunition into it and driving it to Winnsboro where he met Barrow and Bonnie Parker who were to pay him $100 for the trip.

Barrow Delayed Paying

The delivery was made and Barrow purportedly stalled, ordering Nichols to return Tuesday night for his money. Nichols was willing, but in the meantime officers had arrested him, confiscated his delivery machine. Thus angered, Nichols told officers he would accompany them to Winnsboro, but the posse thought twice, left Nichols behind in the Gregg County jail and made the trip as a strictly official party and no spectators. The desperado and his moll were in the Winnsboro area, but the Longview posse missed them. Barrow and Bonnie didn't know it, but the trail which led through the Winnsboro sector also was leading them to their death in a burst of gunfire touched off by such fearless men as Frank Hamer, who for many years was captain of headquarters company, Texas Rangers.

The Dallas man told of pilfering autos for the theft ring and when he decided to talk, called for a Dallas Deputy Sheriff who had served in an old and sensational political ring. State highway patrolmen who have worked under but one order since the slaying of two patrolmen at Grapevine —"get Barrow"— joined the Longview and Dallas officers in Winnsboro Wednesday night to lay in wait for the outlaws.

Shooting Exposes Trap

Weeks of watching and waiting in the Gladewater area were to no avail as officers turned to Grcgg County, as they did to many others, tracing the network of Barro^y trails. An unexpected shooting near Gladewater probably prolonged the quest for Barrow and Bonnie, and that came about with such suddenness that officers gasped. They also realized that another trap for Barrow had been exposed.

Weeks of watching and waiting in the Gladewater area were to no avail as officers turned to Grcgg County, as they did to many others, tracing the network of Barro^y trails. An unexpected shooting near Gladewater probably prolonged the quest for Barrow and Bonnie, and that came about with such suddenness that officers gasped. They also realized that another trap for Barrow had been exposed.

The Gladewater shooting claimed no lives, but it gained momentum over the grapevine telegraph and the outlaws undoubtedly were warned that Gladewater was, on their map and in their parlance, plenty hot. Two undercover men were sent by the State to Gladewater, arriving only hours after Billie Mace or Billie White, a sister of Bonnie Parker, began working at a beer garden on the Gilmer road. Drinks were exchanged. The undercover men were getting along, making contact, gaining information from the rough and the tough side of life through which theyhoped to bring the ruthless desperadoes to the end of their bloody career.

Then the information leaked out that the men were laws in disguise. The shooting broke out quickly. John Gregory, highway officer stationed at Tyier, spent many sleepless nights on a bridge in the Gladewater sector, waiting for Barrow and Bonnie. But the elusive ones went elsewhere. Gregory and other officers several weeks ago took Billie Mace and several of her relatives in custody, grilling them here about the Barrows. Nothing apparently came of that investigation. All of the information gained, however, little by little, word by word, dVentually led to the slaying of the hunted pair.


 

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